iSoccer Publishes The 2010 National Standards Project Report

The National Standards Project is a multi-year initiative to raise the technical level of youth players in the United States. The resulting National Standards will be the benchmark against which future player development will be measured at both the national and individual player level.

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Contact support@iSoccer.org for a copy of the full report for free!

Download the National Standards Project Exec Summary

SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 19 — iSoccer, the leader in technical assessment and online soccer training software, released the first annual National Standards Project report at the 2011 NSCAA Convention. The National Standards Project is a multi-year initiative to measure, analyze and raise the technical level of US youth soccer players ages 6 to 18.

“This was a very successful first year. With the support of our partners, the NSCAA and US Club Soccer, we were able to collect data from all 50 states and from all age groups. Our 2010 goal was to create an initial baseline for technical ability in the United States and we accomplished that. As we move into 2011, we very excited about the second phase of this Project and the growing movement to raise the technical level of players across the country,” stated Scott Leber, Founder and CEO of iSoccer.

The Project borrows from proven academic methodologies by implementing standardized assessment, evaluation, and development metrics. Standardized data provides players, coaches, clubs and soccer governing bodies with a way to measure and compare long-term improvement on a macro and micro level.

For the 2011 National Standards Project, iSoccer will continue to collect data from an ever growing number of players, coaches, clubs and youth soccer organizations. As a new feature, club directors, coaches, parents and players will have the opportunity to share their observations and feedback. Adding more standardized data to a growing assessment database will enable us to analyze the technical level of soccer in the United States both qualitatively and quantitatively. The more coaches and players that record assessment results regularly and share their observations, the more valuable the National Standards Project will become.

In its first year, iSoccer collected over 250,000 assessments for the National Standards Project and plans to double that number for 2011. Coaches are invited to participate by assessing their teams and uploading their results for free.

To learn more about iSoccer visit http://www.iSoccer.org or contact iSoccer at support@iSoccer.org